Reclaim Your Power After A Personal Injury

Construction sites use a wide variety of tools—saws, sanders, hydraulic lifts, lathes and more—to get the job done. However, these tools can pose a significant risk to workers and passers-by alike.

More power can often mean more severe injuries.

Power tools make your work more efficient by providing you with speed and strength that you could not achieve using a hand tool. However, that same power can put you at risk of more severe injuries. For example, workers can be impaled by nails much more easily when using a nail or staple gun. The speed of power saws, as another example, can easily cause workers to lose fingers or limbs or to face fast-moving discharge that could easily blind them.

The electricity that powers these tools can put you at risk.

Most power tools that you may use on a construction site require electricity. The power they use puts you at risk of electrocution, one of the so-called fatal four of construction injuries. Improperly stored tools, improperly maintained tools, faulty equipment and tools used in an environment for which they aren’t intended are particularly hazardous.

Employers have a responsibility to their employees.

Many power tool accidents are preventable through careful training and correct equipment usage. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), employers must provide you with protective equipment necessary to do your job and the training you need to use your tools safely. They are also responsible for the condition of the tools you use.

If a power tool caused you harm on the job site, be sure to speak to an attorney about your injuries. They could help you get the compensation you need to recover after a construction accident.