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Does your employer know these construction safety issues?

On Behalf of | Nov 1, 2021 | blog, Construction Accidents

If you suffered a construction accident recently, you may wonder if you did everything to prevent the mishap. Should you blame your employer for the lack of safety measures?

American Society of Safety Professionals explores vital safety matters for construction sites. Employers who do not look out for their employees could open themselves to a personal injury suit.

Project comprehension

Every worker on a construction site must understand projects and their requirements. Employees should also know who bears responsibility for individual tasks. Project comprehension becomes essential for construction projects involving multiple contractors and employers. Project managers, safety professionals and contractors should know the latest regulations and OSHA standards for every job.

Educated workforce

Employers must ensure workers understand every job site’s unique hazards and risks. Safety professionals and contractors must double-check that all workers have the skills, experience and resources for their job duties. Workers should also receive training on OSHA hazards, such as struck-by hazards, fall hazards, caught-in or between hazards, and electrocution hazards. Safety sessions, known as “toolbox talks,” held before shifts help workers recognize hazards for a specific workday.

Hierarchy of controls

Construction sites operate with a hierarchy of controls. The ranking starts with either substituting or getting rid of dangers. Employers should understand the importance of reducing hazards before descending the hierarch to other controls, such as personal protective equipment. Before workers don PPE, they must receive thorough training, so they know the safest way to use the equipment.

Construction employers owe workers a duty of care. Neglecting that duty could cause avoidable employee harm and unnecessary liabilities.

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