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Retaining wall collapses, killing one construction worker

On Behalf of | Jan 14, 2021 | Construction Accidents

Construction workers have one of the most dangerous jobs in America. Not only do construction workers suffer many slips and falls while on the job, but equipment and machinery also contribute to the dangers of this profession. 

Few people consider how building structures improperly can potentially affect those whose job it is to fix them, however. 

Improperly built retaining wall claims one man’s life

According to the New York Daily News, the collapse of a retaining wall is responsible for the death of one construction worker and the injuries of another. The fall of the nine-foot wall buried the men in rubble as they were on working on the job site. Although emergency crews pulled both men to safety, one man succumbed to his injuries at the hospital. 

Neighbors state that the original retaining wall is of poor construction. It is unclear if this is due to the quality of work done by the original contractors, but neighbors state that the wall was not in good condition. One neighbor mentions that the construction crew was working on fixing the retaining wall after one collapse already occurred. 

Property holders may be liable for improper structures

When accidents such as the above-mentioned happen, families deserve compensation for their loss. Property owners may be responsible when a construction worker sustains injuries from improperly built structures. 

Retaining walls, specifically, must undergo safety assessments every five years. According to Article 305 of the New York City Construction Codes, the property owner is responsible for conducting the assessment and sending safety reports back to the commissioner. 

For construction workers who receive harm from an improperly kept retaining wall, it may be a good idea to explore different legal options. 

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